Monday, February 28, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Hussein Dey Bridge in Algiers (5)

A photo of the Hussein Dey Bridge after the 2003 earthquake. The girders moved off the bearings and the continuous superstructure had to be cut into spans before they could be jacked back in place.

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Overcrossing In Algiers

I am now in Christchurch, New Zealand and so I quickly put a photo of Algeria into my blog before I left.

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Algeria's Bridges: Overcrossing in Algiers by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Saturday, February 26, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Tunnel de la Faculte

Since we looked at a pedestrian undercrossing yesterday, I thought we might as well look at one of the many tunnels in Algiers. Like many coastal cities, Algiers has a lot of pretty hills with tunnels carrying traffic underneath.


When I was last there in 2003 the whole city was undergoing a transformation as a subway was being built under the city.

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Algeria's Bridges: Tunnel de la Faculte by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Friday, February 25, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Pedestrian Undercrossing near Thenia

A pedestrian undercrossing under some railroad tracks near Thenia, Algeria.

Pedestrian undercrossings (and overcrossings) are nice features that can save lives. However, pedestrian undercrossings have become less popular in the US because they provide muggers with a convenient place to accost people. In California, surfers use the culverts under the Pacific Coast Highway to get to the beach.

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Algeria's Bridges: Pedestrian Undercrossing near Thenia by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Isser River Bridge (2)

July 2003 Isser River Bridge  (lat. 36.830· long. 3.678·) on Route 24
Lateral spreading at the banks of the Isser River. This is one of the bridges that fell off its bearings and was cut into simple spans before it was reset.  
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Algeria's Bridges: Isser River Bridge (2) by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Bridge near Zemmouri

Another bridge with the ubiquitous blue steel railing. 

As you may have guessed, I was in Algeria to look at bridges after a M6.8 earthquake that occurred in May of 2003.  The most serious damage was to a couple of long, continuous span bridges that moved off their bearings and had to be cut into simple spans before they could be jacked back in place.

My mother was just telling me how glad she was that there were no devastating earthquakes to drag me halfway around the world when the Christchurch, New Zealand earthquake occurred the very next day.

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Algeria's Bridges: Bridge near Zemmouri by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Highway Bridge Railing in Boumerdes

Another bridge (in Boumerdes) with blue steel railing but without guardrail.

I sometimes hear people in Muslim countries explain a bad situation by saying its 'God's will.' However, based on the recent demonstrations in North African countries, it is not preordained that people should live under a repressive government.

Over 1.5 million Algerians died getting rid of their French oppressors and so far about 150,000 have died trying to get rid of the current government.
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Algeria's Bridges: Highway Bridge Railing in Boumerdes by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Monday, February 21, 2011

Algeria's Bridges: Highway Bridge Railing in Algiers

Instead of the specially-shaped (New Jersey) concrete barrier used on US bridges, Algeria uses guard rail in front of ubiquitous blue, steel railing. Although its questionable whether the guard rail and steel railing is effective at deflecting vehicles back onto the road, it may absorb enough energy to prevent smaller vehicles from plunging off the deck. More likely the guard rail (and railing) is meant to protect people on the sidewalk. Its the length of the guard rail and the number of anchors (including cables buried at the ends) that keeps the rail intact.
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Algeria's Bridges: Highway Bridge Railing in Algiers by Mark Yashinsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Monday, February 7, 2011

Saturday, February 5, 2011

Friday, February 4, 2011

Thursday, February 3, 2011

Wednesday, February 2, 2011